Tips To Help You Learn About Organic Gardening

Gardening is a popular and fun activity that allows you to enjoy the outdoors and adds beauty to your home yard. The key to being a good gardener is educating yourself on the subject and learning about the best gardening techniques and strategies. The following article contains a number of wonderful gardening tips.

A trick to help measure in the garden is to take one of the long handled garden tools like a shovel and mark on its handle using a tape measure. Using a permanent marker, mark out the feet and inches on its handle and when specific distance is required in planing, have a handy measuring device is close at hand.

A good tip of what to plant in the garden is to plant high-value crops. Value is a subjective term, but plant the things that are most costly to buy, as long as they are suited to the climate. The whole garden does not have to be devoted to this, but if an area is earmarked for this type of crop, it can save money in the coming season when prices are sky high for certain crops.

Collecting and preserving autumn leaves is a fun gardening project, especially for the kids. Generations of kids have used the "wax paper method" to preserve fall leaves at peak color - with a little help from Mom. Just select colorful thin leaves that don't have a high water content and place them between two sheets of wax paper. Place a cloth - like an old tea towel - on top of the waxed paper "sandwich" and have Mom slowly run a hot iron (no steam) across the cloth. Peek underneath to see if the wax paper is melting and bear down hard to get a good seal. The wax paper may seem cloudy while it is warm, but it should dry clear as it cools. Enjoy your pretty display of colorful leaves!

When you are working in your garden, be sure to leave the praying mantis alone. These insects are skilled predators which take care of any number of harmful pests. In addition, these praying mantises do not harm your garden in any way, so let them go about their work protecting your garden from pests.

Use mulch to add nutrients to your soil. Mulch is a much better way to amend your soil than fertilizers because it comes from natural ingredients in your garden. Commercial fertilizers may contain undesirable chemicals. In addition, mulch is free. All you need to do is compost your clippings and yard waste in a compost bin. Before long, you will have enough mulch for your entire garden.

During the hot season, water your lawn a couple of hours before the sun rises. If you water during the day, much of the water will evaporate before it gets a chance to be absorbed into the ground. When you water before the sunrise, the water will have a chance to go deep into the soil, allowing the roots to absorb the water.

When it's autumn, it's time to start planting all of your fall edibles. Why not plant lettuce and kale inside a hollowed-out pumpkin? When you have finished cutting and cleaning the pumpkin, spray it with some liquid that will stave off wilting to keep it from rotting. After that, your pumpkin planter is ready to use!

Get your soil professionally tested. The small upfront cost of soil testing will pay for itself many times over. By knowing exactly what type of soil you have as well as what nutrients are present will give you important information for a successful garden. Once you are aware of deficiencies, you can take steps to amend the soil and get your garden off to a good start.

Embrace earthworms in the organic garden! Earthworms are an organic gardener's best friend. Through tunneling and their nitrogen-rich castings, they can help to aerate the soil. This improves the amount of oxygen that gets to a plant's roots, improves water retention capacity, and keeps the soil loose and workable. They actually raise much-needed minerals from the garden's subsoil to the topsoil, where plants can get the greatest benefit. These worms also break up hardpan soil, which is detrimental to root growth.

When watering plants use recycled water, but avoid re-using water from sources such as baths, washing machines, or dishwashing. These water sources may contain harmful chemicals that can be absorbed into your vegetables such as nitrates and phosphates. This water may even contain pathogens that could harm you or your plants.

Gardening, as mentioned at the beginning of this article, is usually more involved than simply combining dirt, water, and seeds. Gathering useful tips and advice, like the ones you learned here, will help you reap the rewards that can come from creating and managing your own successful garden, and truly enjoying the fruits of your labor.
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